Friday, July 26, 2019

All About Fingerboards!

By Andy Fein, Luthier at www.FineViolins.com
and Ivana Truong
A cello fingerboard with a precisely machined metal straightedge on top. Fingerboards need a "hollow or "scoop".

The fingerboard isn't a very prominent part of the violin, but it's incredibly important and surprisingly complex. Fingerboards are constructed in a very specific way to best accommodate the modern violin and have changed a surprising amount since baroque times. Without a well-constructed, well-maintained fingerboard, your instrument can run into a lot of issues.

Sunday, June 23, 2019

Online Lessons for Stringed Instruments

By Andy Fein, Luthier at  Fein Violins
and Ivana Truong

We know as well as anyone that learning an instrument is a massive undertaking. Even the first step, finding a teacher, can be overwhelming and difficult. They have to be in your area, someone who works well with you, and their rates have to be in your price range. That's why more and more students are trying to learn online, whether that's through Youtube videos, websites, or Skype lessons.

Nicola Benedetti's take on vibrato. You can use videos like this 
to compare with what you are learning or have learned to develop your playing

And teachers! If you can develop the skills to teach online or do instructional videos (and charge for them!) you can expand your studio far beyond your geographic area and far beyond the time that you can devote to giving one-on-one lessons.
Tina Guo has some great tips & lessons on her Youtube channel

Tuesday, May 14, 2019

E Strings & E Tuners- What's Best?


By Andy Fein, Luthier at www.FineViolins.com
and Ivana Truong


The E string. In the world of violins, violas, and cellos, only the violin has the privilege and burden to play on the highest string. What sounds best? How do you keep it in tune? How do you keep it from hissing?

Is the E the most problematic string on your violin? Yes? Don't worry, you're not alone.

An 'Evah Pirazzi loop-end E string (right) & a Thomastik 'Special Program' Gold E (left)

Tuesday, April 16, 2019

Classical Music During the Chinese Cultural Revolution


By Andy Fein, Luthier at Fein Violins, Ltd.
And Ivana Truong


In our last blog, we traced the movements of Jewish refugees into Shanghai and other Chinese cities and how these became the seeds for violin playing and Western Classical music in China. For a few decades after World War II, Western Classical music slowly took root in China. But there were many obstacles, not the least of which was the Chinese Communist Revolution and the distrust of anything non-Chinese by those that were suddenly in power. This tension came to a tragic head with the ill-conceived "Cultural Revolution". A time when many musicians had to hide their skills and when many, many violins, violas, cellos, and pianos were destroyed.

 During the Cultural Revolution of China, all foreign mannerisms and culture were banned, including Western Classical music. Musicians and professors of classical music were actively persecuted and instruments were destroyed. Despite this, many people studied music secretively and a few even became professional musicians after the Cultural Revolution ended.

Image from The Red Detachment of Women, one of the operas promoting Mao and his values

Monday, April 1, 2019

Jewish Violinists Brought Western Classical Music to ...... China

By Andy Fein, Luthier, Fein Violins, Ltd.
and Ivana Truong


At the recent Violins of Hope event, which Andy attended, the violinist Xiang Gao was invited to perform “Shalom Shanghai”, a concert and musical telling the history of the violin within China and emphasizing the importance of the Jewish people within that history. The story of Jewish refugees in China is both incredibly important and surprising. Since the story isn't told much, we thought we would share it!
Image result for shanghai sonatas